Eucrisa ointment approved as eczema treatment

eczema photo

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Eucrisa (crisaborole) ointment to treat mild to moderate eczema in patients two years of age and older.

“The approval of Eucrisa is great news for the children and adults suffering from mild to moderate eczema, a community that has not had a new prescription treatment for more than 10 years,” said Albert Bourla, Group President, Pfizer Innovative Health. “This is also an important milestone for Pfizer as we continue to build on our heritage in Inflammation and Immunology by offering innovative treatment options to patients who need them.”

Eucrisa is the first and only non-steroidal topical monotherapy that inhibits the PDE-4 enzyme in the skin. Overactive PDE-4 has been shown to contribute to the signs and symptoms of AD.4 The specific mechanism of action of crisaborole in AD is not well defined.1

“I’m delighted to have a new option for my patients with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis,” said Amy Paller, M.D., Walter J. Hamlin Professor and Chair of Dermatology, Professor of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, a clinical trial investigator. “The results seen in these pivotal Phase 3 studies show the efficacy and safety of Eucrisa as a steroid-free treatment option for people as young as two living with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis.”

What it is

Atopic dermatitis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease, is often referred to as “eczema,” which is a general term for the several types of inflammation of the skin. Atopic dermatitis is the most common of the many types of eczema and onset typically begins in childhood and can last through adulthood. The cause of atopic dermatitis is a combination of genetic, immune and environmental factors. In atopic dermatitis, the skin develops red, scaly and crusted bumps, which are extremely itchy. Scratching leads to swelling, cracking, “weeping” clear fluid, and finally, coarsening and thickening of the skin.

“Today’s approval provides another treatment option for patients dealing with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis,” said Amy Egan, deputy director of the Office of Drug Evaluation III in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER).
Eucrisa, applied topically twice daily, is a phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE-4) inhibitor, although its specific mechanism of action in atopic dermatitis is not known.

The safety and efficacy of Eucrisa were established in two placebo-controlled trials with a total of 1,522 participants ranging in age from two years of age to 79 years of age, with mild to moderate atopic dermatitis. Overall, participants receiving Eucrisa achieved greater response with clear or almost clear skin after 28 days of treatment.

Serious side effects of Eucrisa include hypersensitivity reactions. Eucrisa should not be used in patients who have had a hypersensitivity reaction to Eucrisa’s active ingredient, crisaborole. The most common side effect of Eucrisa is application site pain, including burning or stinging.

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